The Deep Space Approach

4 Phases of Asteroid Mining

Prospecting

Using tiny scouts to locate and evaluate space resources.

Deep Space Industries will soon launch its first prospecting missions, using advanced, small spacecraft — like Prospector — to explore and study Near Earth Asteroids. These prospecting spacecraft will be fitted with sophisticated scientific equipment to help them find water, metals, silicates, and more.  

Learn More:
Prospector: The first commercial interplanetary mission
Innovative propulsion that uses water as fuel

Harvesting

Using robotic spacecraft to extract and transport resources.

After prospecting missions have identified the best locations for mining, Deep Space Industries will send specialized robotic spacecraft to begin harvesting resources such as water. Using the company’s next generation Comet water thruster, water extracted from the target asteroid can also be used as propellant for the return trip.

Learn More:
Is asteroid mining legal?
Near Earth Asteroid 2013 TX68: Trash or Treasure?

 

Processing

Separating resources into usable materials.

Once asteroid materials are returned to near-Earth space, they can then be processed into fuel, drinking water, and building supplies. Harvesting spacecraft will unload their cargo to a processing complex that begins the detailed separation and evolution of materials, getting them ready for manufacturing.  

Learn More:
DSI wins NASA Contracts to Study Asteroid Processing

Manufacturing

Additive manufacturing in microgravity.

Manufacturing in microgravity and hard vacuum offers both opportunities and challenges. The upside of making things in space includes the ability to create very large structures that would never fit into the confines of a launch vehicle’s payload fairing. Huge solar arrays to produce energy and enormous antenna to enhance communications satellites are among the possibilities.

Learn More:
Experience the Future  [VIDEO]

 

The how of getting there

CometTM

 SmallSat Propulsion

News & Announcements

Doug Jones joins Deep Space Industries

Deep Space Industries is pleased to announce that Doug Jones, formerly chief test engineer at XCOR, is joining the company’s growing team as director of propulsion systems. “We see Doug as one of the top rocket engineers in the country, and a great addition to our first-class team of small-spacecraft engineers,” said Bill Miller, the chief executive officer of Deep Space Industries. Read More…

Asteroid Profile: 2017 BS5

An asteroid the size of a football field is headed straight towards us. And it will be here within days. But not to worry because 2017 BS5 will pass by Earth at a safe yet cosmically-snug gap of just 3.15 lunar distances (roughly 756,000 miles). Discovered this February, 2017 BS5 is one of five near-Earth asteroids with close approaches the folks at NASA and the Jet Propulsion Lab have their eye on. Read More…

Deep Space Industries Secures NASA Aerobrake Funding

The NIAC grant will research the manufacturing of an aerobrake system from the asteroid’s regolith (soil) collected from mining operations. The aerobrake system would act as a large heat shield that would allow the spacecraft to pass through Earth’s atmosphere, creating enough drag to slow down the payload without using propellant. Read More…

Bill Miller, Veteran Start-Up Strategist, Joins DSI as Chief Executive Officer

Deep Space Industries is excited to announce that Bill Miller will be joining the company as Chief Executive Officer to position DSI for rapid growth in the coming years. With an impeccable track record of growing technology companies, Bill brings game-changing approaches, solutions, and perspectives to DSI through his experience in defining, developing, and delivering results for dynamic organizations. Read More…

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